Learning Objectives

Chapter 12

These are the learning objectives for this portion of the class:

  1. Compute the probability of a sample mean being at least as high as a specified value when σ is known or estimated
  2. Compute a two-tailed probability
  3. State the assumptions for testing the difference between two means
  4. Estimate the population variance assuming homogeneity of variance
  5. Compute the standard error of the difference between means
  6. Compute t and p for the difference between means
  7. Format data for computer analysis
  8. Define pairwise comparison
  9. Describe the problem with doing t tests among all pairs of means
  10. Calculate the Tukey HSD test
  11. Define linear combination
  12. Specify a linear combination in terms of coefficients
  13. Do a significance test for a specific comparison
  14. Determine whether you have correlated pairs or independent groups
  15. Compute a t test for correlated pairs
  16. Determine whether to use the formula for correlated comparisons or independent-groups comparisons
  17. Compute t for a comparison for repeated-measures data
  18. Compute the Bonferroni correction
  19. Calculate pairwise comparisons using the Bonferroni correction

Chapter 15

These are the learning objectives for this portion of the class:

  1. What null hypothesis is tested by ANOVA
  2. Describe the uses of ANOVA
  3. Determine whether a factor is a between-subjects or a within-subjects factor
  4. Define factorial design
  5. State what the Mean Square Error (MSE) estimates when the null hypothesis is true and when the null hypothesis is false
  6. State what the Mean Square Between (MSB) estimates when the null hypothesis is true and when the null hypothesis is false
  7. State the assumptions of a one-way ANOVA
  8. Compute MSE & MSB
  9. Compute F and its two degrees of freedom parameters
  10. Describe the shape of the F distribution
  11. State the relationship between the t and F distributions
  12. Partition the sums of squares into condition and error
  13. Format data to be used with a computer statistics program
  14. Define main effect, simple effect, interaction, and marginal mean
  15. State the relationship between simple effects and interaction
  16. Compute the source of variation and df for each effect in a factorial design
  17. Plot the means for an interaction
  18. Define three-way interaction
  19. State why unequal n can be a problem
  20. Define confounding
  21. Compute weighted and unweighted means
  22. Distinguish between Type I and Type III sums of squares
  23. Describe why the cause of the unequal sample sizes makes a difference in the interpretation
  24. Compute Tukey HSD test
  25. Describe an interaction in words
  26. Describe why one might want to compute simple effect tests following a significant interaction
  27. Define a within-subjects factor
  28. Explain why a within-subjects design can be expected to have more power than a between-subjects design
  29. Be able to create the Source and df columns of an ANOVA summary table for a one-way within-subjects design
  30. Explain error in terms of interaction
  31. Discuss the problem of carryover effects
  32. Be able to create the Source and df columns of an ANOVA summary table for a design with one between-subjects and one within-subjects variable

Assignments

There are a number of assignments this week, as usual.

Week 6 Activity

This week’s activity covers the presentation of data.

Quiz

Don’t forget about your chapter quizzes! Find them in the Quizzes menu in D2L.

Chapter 12 questions

Remember! For Slack posts involving chapter group questions, answers, and responses, use the following convention at the beginning of your post:

Group 3 picking their question would start with: G3Q
Group 4 answering their question would start with: G4A
Group 5 responding to another group’s answer would start with: G5A

The Slack markup code for writing those would be: *G3Q* and so on, as *s around text make it bold.

  1. Choose a question from the end of chapter 12 in the section called “Exercises” to answer. Post the question and your answer, and make sure to justify your response.

    For example, if you determine that a type of statistic is descriptive, provide your reasoning being specific about the problem presented and your answer.

  2. Next, respond to another students’ answers by asking a question for clarification, providing a personal experience, posting a thought-provoking question, taking a controversial, but professional stand, adding something new to the conversation, quoting another student’s comment and add an additional idea based on this comment, etc.

    Your responses should be respectful and offered in a professional manner. You may wish to review the behavior Course Policies to help frame your response. Remember, you will be responding about the specific idea, issue, or question.

You may not answer a question that has been previously addressed.

Chapter 15 questions

  1. Choose a question from the end of chapter 7 in the section called “Exercises” to answer. Post the question and your answer, and make sure to justify your response.

    For example, if you determine that a type of statistic is descriptive, provide your reasoning being specific about the problem presented and your answer.

  2. Next, respond to another students’ answers by asking a question for clarification, providing a personal experience, posting a thought-provoking question, taking a controversial, but professional stand, adding something new to the conversation, quoting another student’s comment and add an additional idea based on this comment, etc.

    Your responses should be respectful and offered in a professional manner. You may wish to review the behavior Course Policies to help frame your response. Remember, you will be responding about the specific idea, issue, or question.

You may not answer a question that has been previously addressed.


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